Tag Archives: sports

9 Olympians you may not have known were dads because people often only talk about moms.

41-year-old Uzbekistan native Oksana Chusovitina is the oldest female gymnast in Olympic history. She also happens to be a mom, which is often the very next thing you learn about her.

It’s wonderful and inspiring that Chusovitina is a mom to a 17-year-old as well as a seriously talented Olympian at twice the age of her competitors. However, the fact that she’s a mom has become a weirdly necessary addition to her story despite the fact that it has nothing to do with her skills as an athlete.

And she’s far from the only Olympian-slash-mom to have received this sort of treatment.

Swimmer Dana Vollmer won silver and bronze medals, but it’s difficult to find a headline that doesn’t mention that she gave birth a mere 17 months earlier. Nia Ali, who’s competing in the 100-meter hurdle, has been surrounded by articles wondering how does she do it and reporting on how she raised her infant son while training. Kerri Walsh Jennings was five weeks pregnant when she won her third gold medal for volleyball, and it’s still one of the first things mentioned about her. Sure, winning medals while pregnant is pretty amazing, but that was four years ago.

There’s a post on Team USA’s website dedicated to its 10 competitors who are moms but not one for dads despite the fact that there are more than four times that many dads representing Team USA.

Much of the attention Olympian moms receive may be because of the impact pregnancy and new motherhood can have on competing. Considering that intensive training may affect fertility, it’s not surprising that giving birth could also cause some difficulties. Women’s bodies can change dramatically both during and after they’re pregnant. Couple that with the physical and mental strain that occurs during training and competition, and it becomes clear these moms are champions through and through.

Being an athlete and a mother is amazing, but it’s not an impossible feat, and more often than not, it’s not something women do alone.

Olympian dads are also working hard to “have it all” by balancing training with raising kids.

It’s just not assumed to be such a huge feat when a dad can also be an Olympian because we generally don’t associate dads with child care, and we assume they have a wife or someone taking care of their homes and families while they’re working hard. Which is an absurd double standard.

So here we go.

Here are nine Olympic dads:

1. Michael Phelps, swimming

The little man loved the water today!! @boomerrphelps and I got some extra laps in today!! #mpswim

A photo posted by Michael Phelps (@m_phelps00) on Jul 6, 2016 at 11:46am PDT

Phelps’ son Boomer has been getting a lot of attention lately because he’s been sleeping through his dad’s gold-medal-winning races.

“Im always worried that hes sleeping right, breathing right, getting enough food, getting better, Phelps told The New York Times.

2. Jordan Burroughs, wrestling

“Theres nothing harder than being a dad,” Jordan told NBC Olympics (though Jennings and her gold-medal-earned-while-pregnant may beg to differ).

3. David Boudia, diving

“This is my job. More than diving, my job is to make sure my family is well taken care of,” Boudia told NBC Olympics.

4. David Plummer, swimmer

Best taper buddies ever

A photo posted by David Plummer (@plumm006) on Jun 18, 2016 at 5:55pm PDT

“I have just tried to streamline everything else in my life so that I can spend as much time with him and my wife as I can,” he told USA Swimming. “There is nothing more important to me right now than my family.”

5. Carmelo Anthony, basketball

King jumping in on some conference calls #KidMogul #StayMe7o

A photo posted by @carmeloanthony on Jul 6, 2016 at 9:57am PDT

“[Fatherhood] has made me see things different. I now think twice about my actions. Everything I do affects my son Kiyan, King told BCK.

6. John Nunn, race walker

The quote in the tweet says it all.

7. Tervel Dlagnev, wrestling

“Im now a two-time Olympian, but Im most proud of being a husband and a dad,” Dlagnev told Rock Tape.

8. Tony Azevedo, water polo

“One of the ways we get my son to sleep is by saying, ‘When you sleep, you grow!'” Azevedo told Us Weekly.

9. Justin Gatlin, track and field

Day one he wore me OUT but day two….. Daddy won

A photo posted by justingatlin (@justingatlin) on Aug 16, 2014 at 2:14pm PDT

“Im trying to move mountains for him, so Ive got to go out there with the intent to really try to do it,” Gatlin told Us Weekly.

In their own words, these dads-slash-athletes are just as much proud and involved parents as Olympian moms are. The way they’re talked about should reflect that.

Just because these dadthletes, if you will, didn’t experience physical body changes to bring their kids into the world doesn’t mean their roles as parents aren’t as notable as their female Olympian peers’.

So let’s stop directing all the parenting credit to Olympic moms (or subsequently giving credit for them winning medals to their husbands) and eliminate the double standard of coverage for male and female athletes. If motherhood must be included when writing and reporting on the achievements of female athletes, then fatherhood should be reported on for male athletes. That way, hopefully, the idea of a mom who is also an athlete will stop being seen as an “impossible feat” and athletes who are dads can show that child care is something they participate in too as equals.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/9-olympians-you-may-not-have-known-were-dads-because-people-often-only-talk-about-moms?c=tpstream

15 Times Skateboarding Went Really, Really Wrong — Ouch

My brothers were really into skateboarding as kids, but I was never tempted to get my own board and join them.

Besides having no confidence that I’d ever be able to successfully master the sport, I knew that trying it out would only lead to broken bones and pain for me. I may have been a wimp, but I was proven right when my younger brother needed surgery after one particularly nasty accident.

While these people clearly love riding skateboards, they’d likely be the first to tell you that it definitely isn’t for the faint of heart.

1. I can’t stop cringing.

Read More: These Two Were Engaging In A Friendly Wrestling Match When Things Went Horribly Wrong

2. Watching this in slow motion makes it so much worse.

Mom tries dropping in on a skateboard. It…doesn’t go well

//s.imgur.com/min/embed.js

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/skateboarding-fails/

From winemakers to neurosurgeons, these 15 former NFL players got a second chance and a new career.

NFL players have it made, right?

You know, playing a game for millions of dollars, where you get to be financially stable for life?

Well, maybe not.

The average NFL career lasts three and half years. And what comes after isn’t always easy.

And this is one of GOOD gigs. Michael Strahan doing the left shark with Kelly Ripa for an episode of “Live with Kelly and Michael.” Photo by Laura Cavanaugh/Getty Images.

Nearly
16% of former NFL players declare bankruptcy within 12 years of leaving the league. The truth is, pro football retirement can be a tough road; for some, it’s even tougher than taking a hard hit when you’re not expecting it.

Some former players have found a second wind after pro-football although they’re not all doing what you might expect. After all, there are only so many ESPN broadcasting or NFL head coaching jobs out there.

Here are 15 former NFL players with surprising new careers:

1. Kareem McKenzie, psychologist

I’d sit down and share. Photo by NFL/Getty Images.

That’s right, the former 11-season Jets and Giants outside tackle would rather talk it out than take you out these days. He’s
currently studying at William Paterson University in New Jersey, all in the name of helping other former football players and armed servicemen make healthy transitions in their lives.

2. Myron Rolle, neurosurgeon

From brining the pain to alleviating it. Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images.

Rolle only had a short stint with the Titans in 2012 but still made history, being one of only three people to receive the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship and also play for an NFL team. He’s currently studying at the Florida State University College of Medicine and also has found the time to establish the Myron L. Rolle Foundation, looking to help the underserved in health, wellness, and education.

3. Bill Goldberg, WWE wrestler and actor

Goldberg took a jackhammer to post-NFL challenges. Here in 2005 with his wife, Wanda. Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

Any list of retired NFL players would be incomplete without Goldberg. He has called his football days a “dream come true” despite being plagued by injury from 1990 to 1995. He wasn’t a huge fan of wrestling at first, but after Sting and Lex Luther urged him into the ring, he never turned back.

4. Bradley James Pyatt, CEO of MusclePharm

Pyatt stretching before a game waaaaay back in 2004. Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images.

Yes, we’ve moved from professional wrestler to professional businessman. Pyatt found his new career after his use of sports supplements as a Colts wide receiver left his bones weak. The idea for MusclePharm was born, and now Pyatt has a whole new way to make millions.

5. Wayne Chrebet, assistant vice president at Barclays

He played for the Jets, but we won’t hold that against him. Photo by Simon Bruty/Allsport/Getty Images.

You’ve probably heard of Barclays, the giant financial institution headquartered across the seas. Chrebet made his way to Barclays via Morgan Stanley after his 11 years with the Jets as a wide receiver. These days he handles the rock on behalf of hundreds of clients, whose combined assets total around $1.5 billion.

6. Tony McGee, CEO of HNM Global Logistics

From hauling in passes to hauling freight. Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images.

This former tight end for the Bengals, Giants, and Cowboys took his never-give-up attitude into his post-NFL career. He started with a real estate company, which he was happy with until the 2008 recession hit. After the crash, he ran a successful roofing company until he overheard someone telling him just how much contracts in the shipping industry go for. Now he owns his own freight company, which earned more than $1 million in its first year.

7. Dan Marino and Damon Huard, founders of Passing Time

Grape Expectations. Photo via Passing Time, used with permission.

If we were handing out awards, Marino and Huard would no doubt get the Elegance Award. These two former Dolphin QBs (Huard was actually the backup QB to Marino) decided to
open their own winery outside Seattle in 2010. Though the winery is neither Marino’s nor Huard’s main source of income, they’re looking to get closer to profitability by 2017.

8. Eddie George, Broadway actor

“It’s all show business.” Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images.

Performing under bright lights should be no big thing for George after playing running back for the Oilers, Titans, and Cowboys for nine seasons. His role as Billy Flynn in Chicago” in January is just a new chance for him to shine.

9. Erv Randle, Chevrolet dealership owner

Photo via Erv Randle, used with permission.

The former middle linebacker for the Buccaneers and the Chiefs is no longer looking to stop drives, he’s trying to start them. Randle
purchased a Chevy dealership in southern Oklahoma in the hopes of having a “long-term” relationship with the community and made the official announcement in October, according to the Lawton Constitution.

10. Dorsey Levens, film, TV, and stage actor

Looking like a celeb as far back as 2007. Photo by Steve Grayson/NFL for Weber Shandwick (St. Louis)/Getty Images.

Levens took acting lessons while he played for the Green Bay Packers as a running back. He is known for his role in “We Are Marshall” and now as a leading role in “Madea on the Run,” created by Tyler Perry. He also finds time to run a youth sports training and mentoring program called I Am Momentum, headquartered in Atlanta.

11. Keith Fitzhugh and Haskel Stanback, Norfolk Southern Railway

All aboard the “follow your dreams” train with Keith Fitzhugh. Photo by NFL Photos.

Fitzhugh
made headlines back in 2010 when sports analysts thought he went off the rails and declined an offer from the New York Jets, instead choosing to work at Norfolk Southern Railway as a train conductor. Fitzhugh, currently a terminal superintendent, and Stanback, a running back for the Falcons in the 1970s, have had long and successful careers with one of the nation’s oldest transportation companies.

12. Ed Newman and Tony Nathan, judge and bailiff

Tony Nathan running in a little ol’ thing called the Super Bowl, back in 1985. Photo by George Rose/Getty Images.

Our next ex-NFL duo are former Dolphins teammates who live in sunny Florida, holding court and hearing the cases of drunk drivers, robbers, and drug offenders, according to The Miami Herald. Newman, a former guard, offered Nathan, a former running back, a job as a bailiff after Nathan worked coaching stints at professional, collegiate, and high school level. Nathan accepted, and they’ve been keeping order in the court ever since, The Miami Herald reports.

13. Ricardo Silva, high school geometry teacher

It’s all about the angles. Photo by Dave Reginek/Getty Images.

Another surprising career choice is that of Ricardo Silva, who played safety for the Lions and the Panthers from 2011 to 2013. Last year, he decided to join the ranks of Teach for America as a geometry teacher in a Washington high school. He recently told CNN that teaching is harder than football ever was.

14. Michael Strahan, TV host

Getting your morning started since 2010. Photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images for Baby Buggy.

If you haven’t heard of any of the players on this list yet, your waiting is over. Strahan’s reasons for being successful post-NFL is better said by Strahan himself: When you’re a 20-something-year-old athlete and you’re getting a six-figure check every week, you’re not thinking about next week. You’re not thinking, ‘I’m going to be broke,’ or ‘I’m going to need another job.’ But I’ll tell you, there are a lot of broke athletes out there I know plenty and I didn’t want to end up as one,” Strahan told The New York Times.

15. Hines Ward, restaurant owner (among other things)

Trading the Steel Curtain for napkins. Photo by Joe Sargent/Getty Images.

In August, the former Steeler, Super Bowl MVP, and current NBC analyst opened a restaurant in Pittsburgh, called Table 86. Ward said he built the restaurant to create jobs and say thank you to the people of Pittsburgh, according to The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

These are inspiring stories. But not every player knows how to handle life after football.

Luckily, there are resources out there. One of those is NFL Player Engagement, an NFL department focused on the wellness of former and active players, which helps players plan for a stable ideally prosperous second career. This NFL department offers trade courses to help players become electricians, plumbers, or carpenters, and runs a program called
Bridge to Success, which offers peer-to-peer mentorship in the transition out of the NFL.

Charles Way, a vice president at the organization and a former New York Giant Full Back, says it all starts at the beginning. We want players to start preparing for retirement as soon as they walk through the doors as a rookie,” he says.

In a world where watching heroes crash and burn is as enticing as the latest superhero blockbuster, it’s refreshing to see people who meet the challenge and rise above it.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/from-winemakers-to-neurosurgeons-these-15-former-nfl-players-got-a-second-chance-and-a-new-career?c=tpstream

These Freaky Sports From Around The World Make Us Long For Football. Oh My…

When you think about it, a lot of our major league sports are pretty weird. Baseball, for instance, seems to be a competition in taking turns and standing around waiting for something to happen. Whenever I see baseball players doing stretching exercises I always laugh because baseball itself is so easy-going, it could be a stretching exercise for every other major sport.

As weird as that is, these sports from all around the world are even weirder. Check them out in all their glory!

1.) Gurning contest: Quasimodos from around the world compete to see who can make the funniest face.

2.) Extreme Ironing: It’s all about who can iron in the most remote/dangerous place possible. People say I’m weird for not owning an iron, but, I mean, this is way weirder, right? (Please tell my mom you agree.)

3.) Wife carrying: The man who carries his wife through the obstacles the fastest gets the lady’s weight in beer. Grown-ass men only, please.

4.) Elephant polo: Pretty self explanatory. It’s polo on Dumbos.

5.) Toe wrestling: Like thumb wrestling, but presumably smellier.

6.) Camel wrestling: Like toe wrestling, but definitely smellier.

7.) Buzkashi: In parts of the Middle East they like to play a game where the goal is to, while on horseback, get a goat caracas to the other team’s side. Sounds fun?

8.) Chess-boxing: Two opponents/ combatants alternate between moving the chess pieces and beating the crud out of each other.

9.) Kaninhop: This is essentially equestrian events but with bunnies. Disclaimer: As small as jockeys are, there are no jockeys that can ride bunnies as if they are horses. Sorry for getting your hopes up.

10.) Hemp Olympics: Athletes compete in ancient Bonnaroo events such as ‘joint rolling’ and ‘bong throwing’. I guess the second one is really just what they have to do when the cops show up.

11.) Cardboard Tube Fighting: Well so, you get a cardboard tube and you beat up other nerds up with it. The sport is surprisingly organized with the Cardboard Fighting League sponsoring games all over the Northwest.

12.) Kissing competitions: A real life, organized sport, not just a scheme Pepé Le Pew uses to try and seduce poor, uninterested cats.

13.) Woolsack Races: People of the world, I give the most British sport ever invented. A bunch of Brits get together and see who can run up a gentle slope the fastest with a giant bag of wool on their backs.

14.) Man vs. Horse: This is a marathon where humans prove they are superior to horses, which arguably is already undercut by the fact that people are also riding the horses. Also horses don’t wear clothes or know what a ‘marathon’ even is.

15.) Worm Charming: Whether its through shaman spells are just talking to the worms in a flirty sort of way, the only stipulation of this competition is to get as many worms out of the ground as possible.

16.) Hairiest Back Competition: Yeah, I mean you get it. I wonder if style also comes into play. Like, what if someone had back dreads?

17.) Ferret Legging: The goal is to see who can stand the longest with two ferrets in their pants. Something tells me nobody asked the ferrets whose pants they wanted to be in if anyone’s at all.

Gee, these athletes are so looney, I bet if you ask them who their favorite sports player is, they’d say Bugs Bunny when he played for the Tunesquad in Space Jam. Give this a share on Facebook, please. More people need to know about this insanity.

Read more: http://viralnova.com/weird-sports/

A Type Of Wrestling You've Probably Been Picturing All Wrong

Go ahead and picture a sumo wrestler. Yeah, you know, the kind you’ve seen in movies or in history books or even in a Google image search. Now delete it from your brain, or at least make some room in there for a different look. You’re gonna need it.

Read more: http://upworthy.com/a-type-of-wrestling-youve-probably-been-picturing-all-wrong